What sourcing tools do you use besides LinkedIn Recruiter?

over 1 year ago

Hi everyone,

I am a sourcer in an executive search firm that specializes in the tax industry, and I am new to the SourceCon community. I am reaching out to discover whether the other sourcers out there use anything besides LinkedIn Recruiter as their primary sourcing tool.

In my role, I almost exclusively use LinkedIn Recruiter to identify and evaluate candidates for our clients' searches. It appears to be the best sourcing tool on the market right now, in terms of the quantity of candidates concentrated on one platform and the ease with which I can evaluate and forward those candidates on to the recruiters at my company. With a few keywords and custom filters, I can have thousands of potential candidates at my fingertips. With a few clicks, I can marshal those candidates into project folders and present them for recruiter feedback. 

However, as in all relationships (both human and product-based), too much of one thing can blind you to what the rest of the world has to offer, and I am wondering if I am in danger of this happening with LinkedIn. 

So, fellow sourcers, am I right to plunge headlong into an exclusive relationship with LinkedIn, or are there bigger and better things out there? What sourcing tools (if any) do you use besides LinkedIn Recruiter?

9 answers
2
votes
over 1 year ago

Hey Dalton,

Ultimately, the main question you should ask yourself when considering new tools/sites/resources is "will I potentially find what I'm looking for here?" and "is this worth my time?"  Often times, just because you can use a certain tool or dive into a certain resource doesn't mean you should; given what you're looking for and at what point you are within the lifecycle of your search (i.e. "I just started" versus "I feel like I've hit the bottom of the barrel within X resource").  A lot of what you choose to use for your sourcing will depend greatly on the role(s) you're trying to fill and the domain you're working within: for example, if I'm searching for software engineers, it may be really useful for me to spend some time looking at a site like GitHub; but that, of course, won't be useful for someone looking for something like tax lawyers or content marketers (arbitrary examples).

At the end of the day, there's a whole world of potential resources out there (basically, if you can find someone's name on it, you could essentially label it a resource) like the ones already mentioned.  LinkedIn Recruiter just so happens to be an extremely popular tool because the simple fact is it's by far the best source of consolidated professional information about a large number of people (particularly within technical/engineering, sciences, and a variety of business domains).  It's definitely not perfect, but its search capabilities are strong, and you just don't find nearly as comprehensive of information anywhere else (though you could find specific additional details elsewhere that you wouldn't find on LinkedIn; such as getting to know someone's points-of-view/writing style on their blog, for example).  Some people hate on LinkedIn simply because it is so widely and heavily used; but it's heavily used for a reason.  Anything you use beyond that, aside from finding literal resumes (through general Boolean searches, as an example), generally won't give you nearly as much information about a person, so you have to be OK with that going in.

Basically, this is a way-too-long-winded way of saying: there's really no true "bigger-and-better" way than leveraging LinkedIn Recruiter, to be honest, but there are lots of other possibilities that could suit your needs at different points in time (you'll just be limited to basic information like name & title).  What I'd suggest, to be sure, is chatting with other recruiters/sourcers on a regular basis and keeping an eye out for resources that may be specifically applicable to the type of people you're looking for (like TheLadders for executives, which was already mentioned).  Also, keep an eye on SourceCon and other sourcing/recruiting sites/blogs (as well as the social feeds of folks in the community), and always keep an open mind and be willing to get creative when necessary.

One specific thing I'd suggest is getting comfortable with x-ray searching on various search engines, so that if you come across a website that appears to have useful/valuable information, you understand how to dig for it.

0
votes
over 1 year ago

bump ^^

 

(this is a good topic!!)

 

:)

 

 

 

0
votes
over 1 year ago

Well there are other places. Ladders which is free, despite what they would like to think Indeed, while using prophet and other tools can be searched and with those other tools you can find contact info without paying. You can do free boolean searches of course. You can target companies, you can target tax conferences and user groups. Meetup etc etc etc

 

0
votes
over 1 year ago

I know a lot of people don't like it, but I have a lot of success with Jigsaw.com - now data.com and part of Salesforce. It's free. 

Its great for getting work email addresses, phone numbers, names, etc. I am comfortable calling people it work. In most cases, It is better, simpler, and more efficient, if you know their employer to find the switchboard number and call person than to plug and play several boolean searches for their personal contact info with unknown results

 

0
votes
over 1 year ago

Have you tried Zoominfo too?  You can xray Zoominfo: 

Google This:

site:zoominfo.com/p "tax consultant"

Data.com is great as well as the Ladders.  Dont forget indeed.com like Dean said

1 Comment
11 months ago

HI Greg,

Is there a way to use Zoominfo without loading all of my personal contacts?

0
votes
over 1 year ago

Hi Dalton - great question! Dean had some excellent ideas to get you started. I do a lot of executive searches, and find sourcing company blogs as well as face searching on google images helps me spice things up a bit and keep things interesting. Here is an article I wrote on face searching to get you started - http://www.eremedia.com/sourcecon/change-up-your-sourcing-strategy-with-face-searching-by-thejobgirl/

 

I hope this helps!

0
votes
over 1 year ago

Kudos to James Briggs on his answer to Dalton's question above ^^^^

0
votes
about 1 year ago

I definitely agree with James that though there are other alternatives, none may be as robust and swift (or as you state, bigger and better) than LinkedIn right now.

Still, here are some other sites I've used to successfully find and contact talent:

  • GitHub
  • Indeed Resumes
  • Quora
  • YouTube
  • Meetup
  • Google+
  • Slideshare
  • Udemy - course reviewers, instructors
  • Coursera, Udacity, other MOOCs - instructors (reviews mostly anonymized)
  • Blogger/Wordpress
  • Google Search (X-raying will take you far)
  • Eventbrite

These are not standalone, and you will need to use a bit of creativity in your approach. You may also end up using these in conjunction with another tool or two (email verification, email tracking, etc.) 

The key for me is to set a clear goal before I start searching, set a timer for 20 minutes, and focus. You can easily get sucked into a rabbit hole if you aren't focused on the outcome you want to achieve.

You can check out a few more sourcing hot spots here: http://bit.ly/30dosday1

Happy Sourcing,

Maisha

0
votes
9 months ago

Thank you for the detailed and helpful answers, everyone! I have been sourcing for a little over ten months now, and your tips definitely helped me get my bearings during the opening stage of my career. While I still heavily use LinkedIn Recruiter, I have found sites like Ladders and Indeed to be great supplementary resources. I appreciate all of your feedback!